Equal Pay

PUBLICATION FOR PAY IN THE PERIOD INCLUDING 5 APRIL 2017, AND BONUSES PAID IN THE PERIOD 6 APRIL 2016-5 APRIL 2017 INCLUSIVE

We are obsessive about treating our people equally and ensuring that all of our people have an opportunity to grow and develop according to their own ambitions and in their own way. We are confident that our gender pay gap is not caused by men and women being paid differently to do the same job, but is driven instead by the variety of professions we have and the markets we are in.

The overall ‘mean’ gender pay gap is: 25.39% (lower for women)
The overall ‘median’ gender pay gap is: 4.37% (lower for women)

The proportion of male and female full-pay relevant employees in each quartile of the organisation’s pay distribution is:

Quartile Men Women
Upper 43.08% 56.92%
Upper Middle 32.82% 67.18%
Lower Middle 29.74% 70.26%
Lower 33.50% 66.50%

The difference in ‘mean’ bonus payments is: -1.07% (higher for women)
The difference in ‘median’ bonus payments is: 0.43% (lower for women)
The proportion of male relevant employees in receipt of a bonus is: 13.71%
The proportion of female relevant employees in receipt of a bonus is: 9.62%

EXPLAINING OUR GAP

As of the snapshot date (5 April 2017) the data shows our overall mean and median gender pay gap and bonus pay gap based on hourly rates of pay. The percentage shown is the difference in overall mean and median pay and bonus between men and women. We have divided our population into four equal sized pay quartiles, each containing 390 people. The calculations above show the percentage of males and females in each of these quartiles. This shows that in common with many other businesses, particularly those in our sector, we employ many more females than males in customer facing roles, which in our sector are typically found in the Lower and Lower Middle quartiles. This is also true of our Upper Middle and Upper quartiles, where we employ just slightly more women than men. Our overall mean gender pay gap of 25.39%, only slightly higher than the national average, is explained by having a vast majority of women in our workforce employed in Lower Middle and Lower quartiles; the gender pay gap is really confined to the upper quartiles of our workforce, where we have more men in senior leadership roles. We have analysed the data for these quartiles, and this gap does not arise from males and females doing the same job/at the same level of leadership being paid differently, and almost 40% of our senior leadership roles being occupied by women. Males represent slightly more than 60% of our top three structure levels, and our efforts to address this have already had success and will continue for the future.

WHAT ARE WE DOING ABOUT IT?

"We are already obsessive about treating our people equally and ensuring that all of our people have an opportunity to grow and develop according to their own ambitions and in their own way. We have in place clear guidance and principles around equality and diversity. We also already enjoy having almost 40% of our senior leadership roles occupied by highly talented women, almost meeting the UK government’s guidance. We are proud of our history where the number of women reporting directly into our Founder/CEO has fluctuated between 25% and 50%. Currently, one-third of our Founder/CEO’s direct reports are women. All of our internal development programmes (mentoring, releasing potential, leadership and management) are focused at being at 50-50% in attendees. All of our development programmes internally focus on the power and benefit of diversity and inclusiveness. We will further review our approach to pay for parental and maternity leave, and we have just recently extended our flexible working policies for all members of our workforce to enjoy. We will be working with Be Inspired, Retail Week’s campaign which enables us to share best practice in our industry. This approach is just part of our constant evolution; we are certain that we are making progress in all of the right areas and we are confident that we will continue to see ever-growing female representation in our senior leadership roles in the years ahead.

I can confirm that the data contained within this report is accurate.
Sarah Day, People Director