The Carrington Jacket

Our new limited-edition camo jacket, backpack and tote were made in the north of England, inspired by the British military past and present, and in partnership with Help for Heroes.

Factory

Carrington Workwear

ESTABLISHED

1891

Location

Lancashire, England

Speciality

High Quality Workwear Fabrics

Number of Employees

220

Factory

Cookson & Clegg

ESTABLISHED

1860

Location

Blackburn, Lancashire, England

Speciality

Workwear & Technical Fabrics

Number of Employees

25

“Science unfolded her treasures and her secrets to the desperate demands of men”, reflected Sir Winston Churchill, on the fact that though warfare has taken humanity through some of its darkest days, it has also instigated some of our greatest technological advancements – Roman roads, life-saving medical procedures, tea bags, zips, to name but a few. The British, and our forces, have been responsible for many of those wartime innovations and this autumn we've collaborated with Help For Heroes to produce an authentic replica of one of the most game-changing pieces of military kit – the camouflage jacket, designed to disguise and protect soldiers.

The early camouflage smocks, made from DPM (that's Disruptive Pattern Material to us civvies), went into production in the late 1960s and revolutionised modern warfare. The significance of this iconic print has gone on to permeate popular culture and, in homage to it, we returned to the original sources to create our limited edition jacket and backpack. Carrington Workwear in Lancashire, a 125-year-old company that produces about 36 million metres of fabric each year, printed our 100% cotton camo print material. This travelled 16 miles up the road to Cookson & Clegg in Blackburn, a business that's been championing British manufacturing since 1860. There, it was turned into the Carrington Jacket and the Glenkindie Tote. The Pennine Backpack, meanwhile, was crafted in Walsall by Brady Bags, founded by brothers John and Albert back in 1887.

“Carrington Workwear in Lancashire, a 125-year-old company that produces about 36 million metres of fabric each year, printed our 100% cotton camo print material.”

This travelled 20 miles up the road to Cookson & Clegg in Blackburn, a business that's been championing British manufacturing since 1860. There, it was turned into the Carrington Jacket and the Pennine Backpack.

How our Carrington print was made

  • Fabric was imported from a textile mill in Pakistan in a greiged [unbleached, undyed] state
  • That same fabric went through various processes to prepare it for printing and finishing
  • The black is laid down first, then the brown, green and khaki, all done with different screens and printed on a rotary screen machine, which can print 25-35 metres a minute

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